Alison Wright
Any destination that holds a ban for American visitors can’t help but carry an allure.  Just the mention of Cuba will inevitably generate an interest in what has become a mythical destination for many. I found it unusual to travel to a place that hosted tourists from all over the world, although has remained staunchly untouched by the omnipresent American tourist infrastructure. You almost can’t escape the clichés. It really is like falling into a 1950’s movies set. Watching the old cars cruise by, while sucking down minty mojitos and taking in the music and dancing that permeates every street corner and bar, any time of day or night. When the sun sets along the Malecon, the men break out their fishing poles, children dive into the surf and couples remain interlocked for the evening in such passionate absorbed embraces that sea wall becomes somewhat of a love hotel without walls. In Trinidad, devoid of all technical distractions, life spills into the streets. Men tie up their horses and play a rowdy game of dominos at the end of the day, teenagers practice their dance steps for their upcoming Quinceañera, women gossip and show off their babies, while children play baseball with an old bottle to on every street corner.
Cuba
Any destination that holds a ban for American visitors can’t help but carry an allure. Just the mention of Cuba will inevitably generate an interest in what has become a mythical destination for many. I found it unusual to travel to a place that hosted tourists from all over the world, although has remained staunchly untouched by the omnipresent American tourist infrastructure.

You almost can’t escape the clichés. It really is like falling into a 1950’s movies set. Watching the old cars cruise by, while sucking down minty mojitos and taking in the music and dancing that permeates every street corner and bar, any time of day or night. When the sun sets along the Malecon, the men break out their fishing poles, children dive into the surf and couples remain interlocked for the evening in such passionate absorbed embraces that sea wall becomes somewhat of a love hotel without walls.

In Trinidad, devoid of all technical distractions, life spills into the streets. Men tie up their horses and play a rowdy game of dominos at the end of the day, teenagers practice their dance steps for their upcoming Quinceañera, women gossip and show off their babies, while children play baseball with an old bottle to on every street corner.

Alison Wright

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Alison Wright

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